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Basil Seed Drink Recipies and Its Cooling Effect

I have received a large amount of interest in basil seed drinks and how to eat/drink this delicious power/super food. For those who have read the article, 5 Amazing Benefits of Basil Seeds (Sabja Seeds) http://www.truthnhealth.com/2011/10/5-amazing-benefits-of-basil-seeds/, you already know that basil seeds improve digestion, boosts immune system, combats stress, aids in curing respiratory disorders and is great for skin disorders. But did you know that this seed, when consumed, has a cooling effect on the body? Yesterday’s article post on seasonal spring foods and how they cool the body in warming temperatures touches on fruits and vegetables that do just that. The cooling and heating of our bodies according to the changing environment helps us detox and cleanse our body organs so we are lighter, more resilient and stronger than last season. By incorporating the fruits and vegetables available in the springtime (locally and organically), and adding basil seeds to them, you will build yourself an impenetrable defense system against foreign invaders! The  following are recipe suggestions on how to drink and eat basil seeds:

Add spring time apricots, avocados (blend into soups), juiced carrots, blended mangoes, blended peas, crushed or blended pineapples, juiced dark leafy greens (kale, spinach, cucumber, celery, parsley, leeks, watercress).

Mix prepared basil seeds with liquid of your choice (green juice, raw coconut water (my favorite is Harmless Harvest), pineapple juice, organic matcha green tea, almond/coconut/flax/hemp milk) with raw honey, raw agave, maple syrup, lemons, ginger, and your favorite tropical fruit bits: (lychee, mango, mangosteen). Drink and chew and enjoy! Pacify the heat and fire within your body constitution and boost the functions of your internal organs at the same time.

You can also mix prepared basil seeds in creamy drinks as well (smoothies, yogurts, onto of oats or hot/cold morning porridge and cereal). Be creative, for there really is no wrong way to eat basil seeds.

How to prepare basil seeds:

Put 2 tsp. of basil seeds to 1/2 cup - 1 cup of warm water or liquid of your choice. If you want more concentrated of a flavor, drain excess water out after swelling the basil seeds with plain water. The warm water (not boiling) helps to fully swell the basil seeds, releasing antioxidants and digestive enzymes. Allow the mixture to stand for at least 2 minutes with the warm water/liquid to give the seeds time to absorb water and take on a gelatinous-tapioca like texture.

Nutrition

One canned basil seed drink sold in the United States contains 96 calories, 21 g carbohydrates, 21 g sugars and 2 g of fiber. Because of the swollen seeds and their fiber, the drink may curb hunger.

And for those of you who have asked about the differences between chia and basil seeds:

There are a few differences between basil (sabja seeds) and chia seeds, though the seeds do look similar in size. Basil (sabja) seeds are very dark black in color and chia seeds have a greyish look. When they are both soaked in water for 5 minutes, only the basil seeds begin to fully plump and swell up. Chia seeds will do so, but it takes many hours and still do not have the fun, tapioca texture when chewed, as basil seeds do. They taste very similar (bland), unless flavored in a liquid mixture or with sweetener added to it. As far as the nutrition make up of both seeds, basil seeds yields a little more carbohydrates than chia, a little less fat than chia, and a little less protein than chia.

 

5 Responses so far.

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  2. Atul says:

    Thank you Dr Nancy for this wonderful article!

    Currently I am taking sabja for its cooling effect on body. I soak it in glass of water (not warm) for overnight and take it first thing in morning.

    Please let me know if this looks correct or we should have it in warm water only. Also please suggest the change in time if required :-)

    • Dr. Nancy says:

      Where do your basil seeds come from? Ones that are imported from China/Taiwan (unless stated otherwise) are typically almost always heated to kill off any possible contaminants. This unfortunately does hurt the antioxidant levels in the seeds, so soaking them for a day before you eat them will do minimal to changing the level of positive effects in the body. I still believe in consuming the seeds soon after steeping them and after they have “swelled.” There is more active prana (life energy) and you consume it right away, instead of having them stagnant for hours at a time.

    • Dr. Nancy says:

      The best, of course, is to grow your own organic basil, harvest your own seeds and steep them yourself. That will yield the greatest benefits!

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